SUU
Sherratt Library

MLA Style with Examples

The Works Cited is the list of the sources cited in the text of a research paper formatted in MLA style. It appears at the end of the paper, is double-spaced within and between sources, and is arranged alphabetically by the author’s last name. Sources without authors are arranged alphabetically by title (omitting any A, An, The) within the same list. The first line of each source is flush with the left margin; second and succeeding lines are indented ½ inch (or five typewriter spaces) from the left margin.

The following examples follow the lastest guide to MLA style, the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research papers. (SUU call number: LB2369 .G53 2009).

  1. MLA Print Sources
    Book: one author
    Book: 2 or 3 authors
    Book: more than 3 authors
    Government author
    Encyclopedia article
    Encyclopedia article with author
    Newspaper article
    Magazine article
    Journal article
  2. MLA Electronic Sources
    Online book
    Encyclopedia article from a subscription service
    Newspaper article from a subscription service
    Magazine article from a subscription service
    Journal article from a subscription service
    Website
    Article on Website
  3. Social Media Sources
    Blog post
    Youtube video
    Tweet
    Facebook post
    Email
  4. MLA In-Text Citations

1. MLA Print Sources

Book: one author

Barnes, Frank R. The Hand: How Its Use Shapes the Brain, Language, and Human Culture. New York: Pantheon, 1998. Print.

Book: 2 or 3 authors

Ford, Donna Y., and J. John Harris. Multicultural Gifted Education. New York: Teachers College, 2003. Print.

Book: more than 3 authors

Gilman, Sander, et al. Hysteria Beyond Freud. Berkeley: U of California P, 1993. Print.

Government author

United States. Bureau of Land Management. A Guide to Our Federal Lands. Washington, D.C., Government Printing Office. GPO, 1999. Print.

Encyclopedia article

“Mandarin.” The Encyclopedia Americana. 2000 ed. Print.

Encyclopedia article with author

Mohanty, Jitendra M. “Indian Philosophy.” The New Encyclopaedia Britannica: Macropaedia. 15th ed. 2003. Print.

Newspaper article

Abbott, Steve, and Joan Simpson. “Now Playing: Babes in Cyberspace.” Christian Science Monitor 3 Apr. 2002. Extra ed.: C1+. Print.

"Marines Charged in Assault Case." Houston Chronicle 14 Feb. 2003: 6A. Print.

Magazine article

Armstrong, Larry, Dori Jones Yang, and Alice Cuneo. “The Learning Revolution.” Business Week 28 Feb. 2002: 80-88. Print.

Franklin, Cullen. “The Creative Personality.” Psychology Today July-Aug. 2008: 36-40. Print.

Journal article

Hallin, Daniel C. " Sound Bite News: Television Coverage of Elections." Journal of Communication 42.2 (2003): 5-24. Print.

Lindahl, Kristin M., et. al. "Observations of Marital Conflict and Power: Relations with Parenting in the Triad." Journal of Marriage and the Family 61 (2003): 320-330. Print.

2. MLA Electronic Sources

Online book

Baker, Phil. From Concept to Consumer: How to Turn Ideas Into Money. Upper Saddle River, N.J: FT Press, 2009. Safari Books Online. Web. 17 Jan. 2009.

Peters, B. Guy, and Martin Painter. Tradition And Public Administration. n.p.: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 19 Feb. 2013.

Encyclopedia article from a subscription service

"Austen, Jane." Britannica Concise Encyclopedia. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 2006. Credo Reference. Web. 17 June 2009.

OR (URL is optional; ask your professor)

"Austen, Jane." Britannica Concise Encyclopedia. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 2006. Credo Reference. Web. 17 June 2009. <http://www.credoreference.com/entry/ebconcise/austen_jane>.

Howard, Lillie. “Zora Neale Hurston.” Dictionary of Literary Biography: Afro-American Writers from the Harlem Renaissance to 1940. Ed. Trudier Harris. Detroit: Gale, 1987. Literature Resource Center. Web. 26 Jan. 2009.

Newspaper article from a subscription service

Seib, Gerald F. “On Green Affairs, Politics Aren't All Black and White.” Wall Street Journal 11 Apr. 2001. Eastern ed.: A.20. ProQuest Newspapers. Web. 23 Apr. 2009.

Magazine article from a subscription service

Jost, Kenneth. "Student Rights." CQ Researcher 5 June 2009: 501-524. Web. 17 Feb. 2012.

Kluger, Jeffrey. “Dr. Sigmund Doolittle.” Discover Feb. 1996: 84+. Academic Search Premier. Web. 1 Apr. 2009.

Journal article from a subscription service

Guber, Deborah Lynn. “Voting Preferences and the Environment in the American Electorate.” Society & Natural Resources 14.6 (2002): 455-469. Academic Search Premier. Web. 15 Dec. 2008.

Thompson, Michael D., and Robert O. Riggs. “Institutional Expenditure Patterns and the Facilitation of Mission.” Community College Review 27.4 (2000): 1-15. Education Full Text. Web. 12 Feb. 2009.

Website

The Daily Utah Chronicle. University of Utah. 2006. Web. 5 Feb. 2009.

OR (URL is optional; ask your professor)

The Daily Utah Chronicle. University of Utah. 2006. Web. 5 Feb. 2009. <http://www.dailyutahchronicle.com/>.

Article on Website

Davidson, Lee. "Bishop Saves F-y One Vote." Deseret News. Deseret News, 17 June 2009. Web. 18 June 2009.

Green, Joshua. "The Rove Presidency." The Atlantic.com. Atlantic Monthly Group, Sept. 2007. Web. 15 May 2009.

Lubell, Sam. “Of the Sea and Air and Sky.” New York Times. New York Times, 26 Nov. 2008. Web. 1 Dec. 2008.

3. Social Media Sources

Blog post

Lastname, Firstname. "Title of the Blog Post Entry." Blog Title. Publisher. Date posted. Web. Date Accessed.

Email

Lastname, Firstname. "Subject of the Message." Message to Recipient's Name. Date of Message. Email.

Facebook post

Lastname, Firstname. "Enter Facebook post here." Facebook. Date posted. [Date accessed. <web address>]

Tweet

Lastname, Firstname (Username). "enter the tweet message here." Date posted, time viewed. Tweet.

YouTube video

Title of Video. Date of Publication of Video. YouTube. Web. Date Accessed.

4. MLA In-text Citations

The MLA (Modern Language Association guidelines require that you cite any quotations, summaries, paraphrases, and other material used from sources within parentheses typically placed at the end of the sentence in which the quoted or paraphrased material appears. The parenthetical method replaces the use of footnotes. These in-text parenthetical citations correspond to the full bibliographic entries found in a Works Cited list of sources at the end of your paper.

The information that you need to include depends on what type of source the material comes from. For printed material you normally only need to include the author(s)  (or title if there is no author) and page number(s) in your reference. This information can be either included in the sentence that you write, or added in parentheses at the end of the sentence. The parentheses are usually placed at the end of a sentence, between the last word and the period.

Here is an example of how to use MLA in-text parenthetical citation:

In-text parenthetical citation for a paper about cell phones and accidents:

The driver said in court that when he looked up from the cell phone he was dialing, he was three feed from the car and had no time to stop (Stockwell B1). A recent article by an expert on cell phones and accidents estimates that between 450 and 1,000 crashes a year have some connection to cell phone use (Sundeen 23-25). John Violanti of the University of Utah found a nine fold increase in the risk of fatality if a phone was being used in a vehicle (522-23).

Works Cited citations for these information sources:

Stockwell, Jamie. "Phone Use Faulted in Collision." Washington Post 6 Dec. 2000: B1+. Print.

Sundeen, Matt. "Cell Phones and Highway Safety." National Conference of State Legislatures. Dec. 2000. Web. 27 Feb. 2008 <http://ncsl.org/programs/esnr/cellphone.pdf>.

Violanti, John M. "Cellular Phones and Fatal Traffic Collisions." Accident Analysis and Prevention 30 (1998): 519-24. Print.